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No, OpIndia, Rajasthan Police Did Not Declare a True Incident as ‘Fake News’

Despite taking down his tweet, @Ashok6510 retweeted the OpIndia article discrediting Rajasthan police’s statement.

On December 17, OpIndia published an article titled – ‘Rajasthan Police ends up declaring a true incident as ‘fake news’ on Twitter’. 

OpIndia was referring to Rajasthan police’s reply to Twitter user @Ashok6510, who had tweeted a video of a brawl with the caption – “Muslim workers entered houses of Rajputs in Utambar, assaulted the daughters and sisters and attacked their homes. If the state is such in 5 hours, what will be the torture in 5 years.” In the last sentence, he hinted at Congress’s victory in the recent Rajasthan elections.

The Rajasthan police tweeted that the video posted in the tweet was from Ranchi, Jharkhand. They warned @Ashok6510 and asked him to delete the tweet. He took down the tweet but its screenshot can be viewed below and an archive link can be accessed here.

The same video has also been shared by other individual users on social media.

https://www.facebook.com/priyanka.nagvanshi.520/videos/159564391674742/?t=0

The video was of a June 2018 incident from Ranchi, Jharkhand

The video tweeted by @Ashok6510 actually pertained to an unrelated incident from June 2018 that occurred in Ranchi, Jharkhand.

The incident was reported by several media organisations. According to a Firstpost report“…communal clashes occurred on 10 June when a crowd at the jam-packed Eid-bazaar in Hindpiri’s Main Road, got into a fight with a group of people holding a bike rally celebrating four years of Modi government. One of the bikes, reportedly hit a woman, triggering clashes in the area.”

“Later that evening, two clerics were attacked on their way back from a Madrassa in Nagri, on the outskirts of the capital and were allegedly forced to chant the name of a certain ‘god’, further inflaming communal passions,” added the report.

A rumour of banned meat found in a temple fueled the tension further, leading to stone-pelting between members of two communities.

A video of the above stated clashes in Jharkhand was tweeted by @Ashok6510 as communal violence in Rajasthan. The state police had called out this claim and termed it fake news. @Ashok6510 later replied to Rajasthan police that he has deleted his tweet.

OpIndia later added an ‘update’ to its story, stating that while the video shared by @Ashok6510 was “wrong”, the narrative was correct. OpIndia blamed the Rajasthan police for not attaching the entire tweet by @Ashok6510, “in the absence of which a real incident was being tagged as fake news”. 

The update does little to substantiate OpIndia’s report as the media outlet itself did not ‘fact-check’ the video attached to the tweet, only the narrative.

Results of the recent assembly elections have given rise to misinformation claiming violence in states where Congress came out victorious. Recently, a video from Gujarat was shared as an incident of rioting after the party won in Rajasthan. Many other such false claims (12) suggested Pakistani flags and pro-Pakistan slogans were raised at Congress rallies. While Rajasthan police have been trying to prevent the spread of misinformation, OpIndia came out in support of a handle circulating fake news. The cycle of disinformation gains further momentum when media outlets themselves attempt to discredit the truth.

This article was first published at Alt News.

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